Would you pay the same for a putter as you would for a driver?

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Yep I would, purchased a new driver and putter last year and both were similar costs. If you add in the putter fitting, the putter was slightly more than my driver.

I actually wanted a Scotty as I do think they look gorgeous, but on the fitting I actually preferred an Evnroll and Ping putter.
I’d didn’t like the finish on the Evnroll and went Ping, but that could have been to match my other clubs.
 

Siolag

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Don't quite understand the logic. You recognise there is little to no tech, so there is no justification for the high price.

Having said that, I think people are very entitled to spend their money however they wish!
If you are buying a new driver, it’s going to be because you think the new driver will go further than the old one you have.

A putter isn’t the same, and if you like the way it looks, feels and generally performs, you’ll likely keep it much longer. If my Scotty goes 10 years, that’s £35 a year. Granted, a driver could easily last that, but I think you’d be feeling like you could do better with newer. That’s much more likely to happen at the long end of the bag for most.

Having said that, there’s no need for £350 putters, and one half or a third of that will definitely do the job. It then becomes like any other stuff you buy.
 

pauldj42

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If you are buying a new driver, it’s going to be because you think the new driver will go further than the old one you have.

A putter isn’t the same, and if you like the way it looks, feels and generally performs, you’ll likely keep it much longer. If my Scotty goes 10 years, that’s £35 a year. Granted, a driver could easily last that, but I think you’d be feeling like you could do better with newer. That’s much more likely to happen at the long end of the bag for most.

Having said that, there’s no need for £350 putters, and one half or a third of that will definitely do the job. It then becomes like any other stuff you buy.
Why buy a BMW when a Vauxhall Corsa will do?
There’s a market out there for all.
 

KenL

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If you are buying a new driver, it’s going to be because you think the new driver will go further than the old one you have.
No completely true. It might be you are looking for more forgiveness or a different shaft that is better fitted to you.
 

HomerJSimpson

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All about performance and if you can get something working on less than a Scotty then crack on. If you think the Scotty is the answer and it works then crack on. Whatever is reliable from 2-6 feet gets my vote every time whatever it cost
 

Robster59

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As has been said, pay what you want if it makes you happy. In my mind, the prices of clubs have gone silly recently. The latest Callaway irons are getting on for double what I paid for them 3-4 years ago. My XR16 driver cost me £200 (ok in a pro shop sale). Modern drivers are again getting on for double that. Where is the justification?
And whilst you can't buy a good branded driver new for less than £300 now, there are other, lesser brands that perform well for your normal average club golfer. And for putters, it's more to do with the person on the other end than the club itself. You get a club you feel comfortable with and then work with that. But paying £300 for a club won't make you a better putter or drive the ball straighter or longer (yes, there have been improvements in distance but not much as much as the manufacturers would like you to believe).
But then again, I'm a tight a*** and don't see the need to pay that much money.
Ah, what the hell. If you like it and can afford it, go for it. You use the putter more often than you use your driver so why shouldn't it be as horrendously overpriced as the driver?
 

Orikoru

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It seems that some on here actually believe the marketing guff surrounding the so-called technology in drivers.

In my view we should all feel free to buy whatever kit we want with our own money, be it a driver, putter irons or whatever.

Just don't feel the need to justify your purchase by churning out the BS produced by the mfrs.
You know people test these things right?? :LOL:
 
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I have no issue spending more on putters than a driver, granted more tech and material cost in a driver but a putter will outlast it and hold value. Slightly different for me as I genuinely enjoy collecting and tinkering with putters however only own scotty's

Main putter I play currently is Scotty Concept X CX-02 which was £500 but I think although I got a bit of discount from the pro.

I have an old scotty studio design that will go into play soon as it gets a little gritty during winter months and putters get a lot of wear and tear. Its a lovely putter but has plenty of patina so fits the bill. It has a TON more character than the cx-02

They don't venture on the course but a few in the collection which I'm just keeping mint and to stare at:


Teryllium T22 Newport
Napa
Custom Shop Laguna with a couple of stamps.
 
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Over £200 is insanity for me, made worse if you are a mid to high handicapper.

But each their own, if you want to splash the cash then go for it, who cares what people think!
 
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Four miles too far!
You know people test these things right?? :LOL:
What? You mean the people who rely upon the club manufacturers for advertising revenue.

Just look at the stats for club golfers.

In 20 years distance has increased by only a small amount and as for dispersion the lack of any real reduction in average handicaps suggests no massive gain.
 

Crow

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What? You mean the people who rely upon the club manufacturers for advertising revenue.

Just look at the stats for club golfers.

In 20 years distance has increased by only a small amount and as for dispersion the lack of any real reduction in average handicaps suggests no massive gain.
Might that be because golfers don't need to practice so much to achieve their perceived handicap level?
ie the newer forgiving equipment offsets creeping swing flaws and so the player can maintain their comfort handicap, which has resulted in an overall reduction in player skill level?

Just a thought. ;)
 

Orikoru

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What? You mean the people who rely upon the club manufacturers for advertising revenue.

Just look at the stats for club golfers.

In 20 years distance has increased by only a small amount and as for dispersion the lack of any real reduction in average handicaps suggests no massive gain.
Plenty of independent guys on YouTube testing clubs. Also, every time one of us does a club fitting? When I did mine I didn't imagine that it was longer off bad strikes and sliced less than my five-year old driver - it was there on the screen in front of me.
 
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As has been said, pay what you want if it makes you happy. In my mind, the prices of clubs have gone silly recently. The latest Callaway irons are getting on for double what I paid for them 3-4 years ago. My XR16 driver cost me £200 (ok in a pro shop sale). Modern drivers are again getting on for double that. Where is the justification?
And whilst you can't buy a good branded driver new for less than £300 now, there are other, lesser brands that perform well for your normal average club golfer. And for putters, it's more to do with the person on the other end than the club itself. You get a club you feel comfortable with and then work with that. But paying £300 for a club won't make you a better putter or drive the ball straighter or longer (yes, there have been improvements in distance but not much as much as the manufacturers would like you to believe).
But then again, I'm a tight a*** and don't see the need to pay that much money.
Ah, what the hell. If you like it and can afford it, go for it. You use the putter more often than you use your driver so why shouldn't it be as horrendously overpriced as the driver?
Agree with this.

The downside to paying £300 to £500 for a Driver or Putter is that you are encouraging the manufacturers to keep upping their prices. I don't believe this is justified but it shows no signs of stopping at the moment.

The main manufacturers do create a huge pricing gap for smaller, direct to consumer manufacturers. I have a Driver from Caley Golf (previously Old Tom) which was £135. To me the product I received last year feels like a quality product and I'm sure it is out of same factory as a Callaway or Taylor Made that is selling for £450. They have a really nice looking set of irons out that look the business, which are £399 but with 10% and 15% discounts available quite often.
Caley Golf Irons

The main thing that is stopping me is that I may decide to splash the cash on a premium product, but these are very tempting and I'm sure would perform as well as £1,000 worth of Titleist or Mizuno, in my modestly skilled hands.

Ben Hogan also has a decent rep as direct to consumer. These companies don't spend millions advertising on Tour Pro golf bags or put a load of demo clubs in circulation each year.
 

Crow

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The main manufacturers do create a huge pricing gap for smaller, direct to consumer manufacturers. I have a Driver from Caley Golf (previously Old Tom) which was £135. To me the product I received last year feels like a quality product and I'm sure it is out of same factory as a Callaway or Taylor Made that is selling for £450. They have a really nice looking set of irons out that look the business, which are £399 but with 10% and 15% discounts available quite often.
Caley Golf Irons
If I were in the market for new clubs I'd seriously consider those.
Sensible lofts too, only one gap wedge needed.
 

azazel

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I would - and just have - paid the same for a putter as I did for my driver - £350. Will the putter necessarily do a better job than my current one? Nope, but I wanted the one I've bought and it's something I intend to keep for the rest of my days, even if it ends up being in and out of the bag, so I'm happy with that price.
 
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Four miles too far!
Plenty of independent guys on YouTube testing clubs. Also, every time one of us does a club fitting? When I did mine I didn't imagine that it was longer off bad strikes and sliced less than my five-year old driver - it was there on the screen in front of me.
So the stats regarding driving distances for club golfers must be wrong 🤔

I have seen many of the reviews on YouTube etc; but rather like many fittings they are dependent upon monitors and not verified.

I have no issue with modern equipment and I am sure that the drivers do include technology that has taken much time and money to develop.

My point is that the tech benefits the top players but makes little difference to the likes of you and I.
 

Orikoru

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So the stats regarding driving distances for club golfers must be wrong 🤔

I have seen many of the reviews on YouTube etc; but rather like many fittings they are dependent upon monitors and not verified.

I have no issue with modern equipment and I am sure that the drivers do include technology that has taken much time and money to develop.

My point is that the tech benefits the top players but makes little difference to the likes of you and I.
It made a difference to me or I wouldn't have bought it.
 
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