Wearing non "golfing" waterproofs

Joined
Jul 24, 2012
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Bought a good pair of hiking waterproof trousers - for walking but mainly with golf in mind. Didnโ€™t spot they had no pocket slits ๐Ÿ˜‚

My hiking showerproof โ€˜craghopperโ€™ type trousers are however perfect for golf.

one of our groupโ€˜s โ€˜Oldiesโ€™ wears an old-fashioned anorak with hood. Itโ€™s not the best look but - to be fair - I doubt he cares a monkeys what it looks like if it works for him.
 
Joined
Jul 24, 2009
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I want to know where these people live who only have rain 3 and/or 6 months of the year. He says as he watches the July rain out of his window while contemplating the rain that is forcast for Friday and Saturday when he is playing.
As for the OP. Proquip, decent Proquip, I got my Trophy jacket, designed for the Euro Ryder Cup team for something like ยฃ80 off eBay.
I have just had a look and there is a Proquip Tourflex 360, brand new, for ยฃ60. I used one of those before the Trophy, it is still in my wardrobe now, and it is a fine jacket.
 

Jimaroid

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Some of my thoughts on waterproofs design and use.

The trade off you have to make with any waterproof gear is choosing which way you're going to get wet. Accept you will get damp one way or another because there isn't a perfect material yet. Choosing how damp you get and for how long you will be damp to stay warm is the real problem. Materials is where the costs lie in that trade off. You either go cheap and sweaty with 100% waterproof or you spend a lot of money on breathable materials which are not 100% waterproof. The mistake a lot of people make is that cheaper materials are often the more waterproof (and windproof) option compared to the expensive ones! However because those cheap materials aren't breathable you soak yourself in sweat instead. So first comes acceptance, whatever route you choose you're going to get damp.

I'd say waterproof over trousers are all cross-purpose, there's nothing very fancy you can do in shape/fit, they're always going to be baggy tubes. You get wet either from sweat internally or from the rain externally. I very rarely use them for golf, I prefer a layer of merino leggings and any synthetic trousers with a water repellant treatment. I sometimes get a little damp but not cold that way, and I've played many a very wet and windy round of golf doing this. A cheap pair of waterproof over trousers works for the extreme periods of short use but within about 20 minutes you turn into a sweaty mess and wetter with them on than off. They work OK though, there's no reason to have golf specific waterproof trousers beyond style choice IMO.

Jackets are a different problem. I've got some really good mountain climbing jackets in a variety of materials for differing uses and whilst they're all technically warmer or drier than most golf jackets they're useless for playing golf in. The main problem is simple things like collars, hoods, zips, pockets and fasteners all getting in the way for golf. Alpine climbing waterproofs are designed with minimal fuss and maximum stretch so should in theory be perfect for the golf swing but they're not; the length of the arm cut, waist cut and the hoods which are designed to go over helmets are just infuriating. Nothing worse than a hood flapping around your face half way through a swing. Generic / Cheap waterproof jackets are generally modelled in the same generous cuts as the expensive jackets and they work fine for golf if you can put up with the irritation of getting wet from sweat and all the flapping of longer sleeves, loose fitting pockets and all that. I can't put up with that annoyance, so my strategy is the money I save with the trousers is better invested in the jacket. Any GoreTex(a-like) jacket cut looser in the shoulders but short in the arm, with minimal collars, fasteners and pockets is much better for golf.

Decathlon's gear is generally pretty good value. Like many others I use some of it for mountaineering/hillwalking, I have some Quecha gear that is still useful past 10 years old now. I would be happy enough with their cheap over trousers for short and extreme occasions on the course but not the jackets.

Anyway, enough typing the point I was making is I think waterproof trousers work across any activity but jackets don't.
 

hairball_89

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Feb 26, 2016
Messages
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As mentioned in the other thread. I've got one of these. https://islandgreengolf.co.uk/colle.../products/island-green-golf-waterproof-jacket

Sub ยฃ40. Brilliant. Not a fashionable golf brand, but it's definitely waterproof! I've not had it long enough to talk about it's longevity, but it's far far better than the Regatta waterproof I was using when I knew it as going to be wet. So much so, that I've been wearing this our walking the dog recently rather than my 'everyday' waterproofs!
 

Bunkermagnet

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I have an old Sunderland Goretex jacket, that even after 15 yrs is still totally dry (and fit me)
I also have a Sunice waterproof jacket, not Goretex but able to withstand anything thatโ€™s thrown at it for a few hours, it is also lighter than the Sunderland and slightly cooler to wear.
in my bag all year is a Sunice half sleeve waterproof jacket, that is lighter still and good for a couple of hours of extreme weather but obviously oly half sleeves.

Its not just how they give you ability to freely swing, but how small they pack up to go in the bag.As fas as use over time equation, you have 14 clubs, but how many times do you use all those clubs in a round?
 

Traminator

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Apr 6, 2020
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Some of my thoughts on waterproofs design and use.

The trade off you have to make with any waterproof gear is choosing which way you're going to get wet. Accept you will get damp one way or another because there isn't a perfect material yet. Choosing how damp you get and for how long you will be damp to stay warm is the real problem. Materials is where the costs lie in that trade off. You either go cheap and sweaty with 100% waterproof or you spend a lot of money on breathable materials which are not 100% waterproof. The mistake a lot of people make is that cheaper materials are often the more waterproof (and windproof) option compared to the expensive ones! However because those cheap materials aren't breathable you soak yourself in sweat instead. So first comes acceptance, whatever route you choose you're going to get damp.

I'd say waterproof over trousers are all cross-purpose, there's nothing very fancy you can do in shape/fit, they're always going to be baggy tubes. You get wet either from sweat internally or from the rain externally. I very rarely use them for golf, I prefer a layer of merino leggings and any synthetic trousers with a water repellant treatment. I sometimes get a little damp but not cold that way, and I've played many a very wet and windy round of golf doing this. A cheap pair of waterproof over trousers works for the extreme periods of short use but within about 20 minutes you turn into a sweaty mess and wetter with them on than off. They work OK though, there's no reason to have golf specific waterproof trousers beyond style choice IMO.

Jackets are a different problem. I've got some really good mountain climbing jackets in a variety of materials for differing uses and whilst they're all technically warmer or drier than most golf jackets they're useless for playing golf in. The main problem is simple things like collars, hoods, zips, pockets and fasteners all getting in the way for golf. Alpine climbing waterproofs are designed with minimal fuss and maximum stretch so should in theory be perfect for the golf swing but they're not; the length of the arm cut, waist cut and the hoods which are designed to go over helmets are just infuriating. Nothing worse than a hood flapping around your face half way through a swing. Generic / Cheap waterproof jackets are generally modelled in the same generous cuts as the expensive jackets and they work fine for golf if you can put up with the irritation of getting wet from sweat and all the flapping of longer sleeves, loose fitting pockets and all that. I can't put up with that annoyance, so my strategy is the money I save with the trousers is better invested in the jacket. Any GoreTex(a-like) jacket cut looser in the shoulders but short in the arm, with minimal collars, fasteners and pockets is much better for golf.

Decathlon's gear is generally pretty good value. Like many others I use some of it for mountaineering/hillwalking, I have some Quecha gear that is still useful past 10 years old now. I would be happy enough with their cheap over trousers for short and extreme occasions on the course but not the jackets.

Anyway, enough typing the point I was making is I think waterproof trousers work across any activity but jackets don't.
That's a whole load of information from the 1980s ๐Ÿ˜‰.

There is no way now you have to choose between either letting water in or sweating.
 

jim8flog

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I have an old Sunderland Goretex jacket, that even after 15 yrs is still totally dry (and fit me)
?
I still have a pair of Sunderland Goretex trousers bought around 1989 still as waterproof as the day I bought them. It is just they are so faded from all the years of use that I have turned them in to gardening and car washing trousers. (similar thing with a Pro Quip Goretex Jacket).
 

sunshine

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Dec 17, 2018
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Some of my thoughts on waterproofs design and use.

The trade off you have to make with any waterproof gear is choosing which way you're going to get wet. Accept you will get damp one way or another because there isn't a perfect material yet. Choosing how damp you get and for how long you will be damp to stay warm is the real problem. Materials is where the costs lie in that trade off. You either go cheap and sweaty with 100% waterproof or you spend a lot of money on breathable materials which are not 100% waterproof. The mistake a lot of people make is that cheaper materials are often the more waterproof (and windproof) option compared to the expensive ones! However because those cheap materials aren't breathable you soak yourself in sweat instead. So first comes acceptance, whatever route you choose you're going to get damp.

I'd say waterproof over trousers are all cross-purpose, there's nothing very fancy you can do in shape/fit, they're always going to be baggy tubes. You get wet either from sweat internally or from the rain externally. I very rarely use them for golf, I prefer a layer of merino leggings and any synthetic trousers with a water repellant treatment. I sometimes get a little damp but not cold that way, and I've played many a very wet and windy round of golf doing this. A cheap pair of waterproof over trousers works for the extreme periods of short use but within about 20 minutes you turn into a sweaty mess and wetter with them on than off. They work OK though, there's no reason to have golf specific waterproof trousers beyond style choice IMO.

Jackets are a different problem. I've got some really good mountain climbing jackets in a variety of materials for differing uses and whilst they're all technically warmer or drier than most golf jackets they're useless for playing golf in. The main problem is simple things like collars, hoods, zips, pockets and fasteners all getting in the way for golf. Alpine climbing waterproofs are designed with minimal fuss and maximum stretch so should in theory be perfect for the golf swing but they're not; the length of the arm cut, waist cut and the hoods which are designed to go over helmets are just infuriating. Nothing worse than a hood flapping around your face half way through a swing. Generic / Cheap waterproof jackets are generally modelled in the same generous cuts as the expensive jackets and they work fine for golf if you can put up with the irritation of getting wet from sweat and all the flapping of longer sleeves, loose fitting pockets and all that. I can't put up with that annoyance, so my strategy is the money I save with the trousers is better invested in the jacket. Any GoreTex(a-like) jacket cut looser in the shoulders but short in the arm, with minimal collars, fasteners and pockets is much better for golf.

Decathlon's gear is generally pretty good value. Like many others I use some of it for mountaineering/hillwalking, I have some Quecha gear that is still useful past 10 years old now. I would be happy enough with their cheap over trousers for short and extreme occasions on the course but not the jackets.

Anyway, enough typing the point I was making is I think waterproof trousers work across any activity but jackets don't.
I agree with your last sentence.

The rest of the post sounds like it belongs in the vintage golf thread.
 

Jimaroid

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This โ€vintageโ€ knowledge is called the second law of thermodynamics. One way semi permeable membranes do not exist, no matter how much marketing KoolAid people drink. If water vapour can travel in one direction through a membrane it can travel in the other direction - all such membranes or composite sandwiches of membranes only work due to a temperature or pressure differential between the two sides. A simple gust of wind will mean water vapour can passes back through a so-called waterproof membrane for example.
 
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