Playing to Handicap

rosecott

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When calculating stableford scores, it absolutely does. On a par 4, an 18 handicapper scores 2 points by getting the ball in the hole in 5 shots. On a par 5, they would score 3 points by getting the ball in the hole in 5 shots.

No need to be condescending.
I don't think he was being condescending. It was just that you seem unable to accept that, in terms of playing exactly to handicap, you have to look at the relationship between the course par and its SSS. If the SSS is 1 lower than par you need to score 37 points to play exactly to handicap. If it's 2 lower, it's 38 points and so on. Would you expect the number of points to play exactly to handicap to be the same whether you played off whites or yellows?
 
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jim8flog

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Day 1 of WHS, do I get a shed load of shots on my handicap, so overnight after years of playing off 5 I'm suddenly a 9 handicap?
It is very easy to calculate what your handicap index, course handicap then playing handicap will be under the WHS (there will be charts for this when it comes in)

Look at your handicap record, take the best 8 gross differential scores from the last 20 divide by 8 and you have your handicap index (round to one decimal point).

Find out the slope index for where you are playing ( https://ncrdb.usga.org/ ) divide this 113 and multiply by your handicap index, round to a whole number and this is your course handicap.

For a singles strokeplay comp the Course Handicap is multiplied by 0.95 to get to a playing handicap (0.4 goes down and 0.5 or better goes up).

From all this I would expect to see about a 2 shot difference at most depending on what the decimal figure is in the last calculation.
 

saving_par

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It is very easy to calculate what your handicap index, course handicap then playing handicap will be under the WHS (there will be charts for this when it comes in)

Look at your handicap record, take the best 8 gross differential scores from the last 20 divide by 8 and you have your handicap index (round to one decimal point).

Find out the slope index for where you are playing ( https://ncrdb.usga.org/ ) divide this 113 and multiply by your handicap index, round to a whole number and this is your course handicap.

For a singles strokeplay comp the Course Handicap is multiplied by 0.95 to get to a playing handicap (0.4 goes down and 0.5 or better goes up).

From all this I would expect to see about a 2 shot difference at most depending on what the decimal figure is in the last calculation.
I understand all this, the bit I am trying to get my head round was 36 points equating to par/handicap off any tee.

I understand different rating for different tee.

Lets say my handicap after all of the above is exactly the same as it is now, in the example I used I would go from 32 points as playing to handicap (css 4 higher than par) to having to score 36 points off same tees and same handicap. This is the bit I can't get my head round.
 

ScienceBoy

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It is something you should always expect to do.

Give yourself the gameplan, sufficient practice and mental approach to do so every round. (Strategy, technical and mental)

If you don’t do it then adjust the above, like increasing specific practice where you know or feel you lose shots. Or maybe make the game plan more or less aggressive.

Take each round as a learning opportunity, even if you meet or exceed expectations.

Never beat yourself up about not achieving it, as you just need to address one or more of the three aspects of Strategy, Technical and Mental.

Finally play for fun, against yourself and never be afraid to lose, instead channel that energy it into a drive to improve.
 

Traminator

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When calculating stableford scores, it absolutely does. On a par 4, an 18 handicapper scores 2 points by getting the ball in the hole in 5 shots. On a par 5, they would score 3 points by getting the ball in the hole in 5 shots.

No need to be condescending.
It's not condescending, it's just telling you very bluntly to do some research because you are wrong and you won't believe all the people on here telling you the facts.

Imagine a scratch handicapper, off 0.

On Saturday he shoots 18 pars for a 72 in the medal, net 72. SSS is 71 and CSS for the comp is 71. He has played 1 shot over his handicap, he needs to be 1 under par to play to his handicap.

The next day, playing off zero, he shoots exactly the same, 18 pars for 36 points. SSS is 1 under par and CSS stays at 1 under par.
HE IS THEREFORE 1 SHOT OVER HIS HANDICAP... HE NEEDS 37 POINTS TO PLAY TO HIS HANDICAP.
 

Traminator

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Lets say my handicap after all of the above is exactly the same as it is now, in the example I used I would go from 32 points as playing to handicap (css 4 higher than par) to having to score 36 points off same tees and same handicap. This is the bit I can't get my head round.
Did you see my explanation?

Each time you play a course, your handicap will/might be different and will be worked out from the chart BEFORE you tee off.

You could be a 5 off whites at your own course and a 3 off yellows.
On another course you might be a 6 off the whites and 4 off the yellows.
Therefore, since the adjustment has already taken place, 36 is the benchmark for playing to that.
 

hovis

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My simplistic view is that, given how it is calculated, your handicap is you on a very good day and therefore you should expect to only shoot it occasionally.
I've never understood this mentality. handicap is what I shoot on a normal day. You then have very good days and very bad days. Handicap is supposed to reflect on your playing ability
 

Canary Kid

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I've never understood this mentality. handicap is what I shoot on a normal day. You then have very good days and very bad days. Handicap is supposed to reflect on your playing ability
It‘s not a mentality, it is a fact. The method of calculating a handicap uses a multiplying factor of less than 1 which means that your handicap is not what you normally shoot. If you normally shoot your handicap, it is too high.
 

saving_par

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Did you see my explanation?

Each time you play a course, your handicap will/might be different and will be worked out from the chart BEFORE you tee off.

You could be a 5 off whites at your own course and a 3 off yellows.
On another course you might be a 6 off the whites and 4 off the yellows.
Therefore, since the adjustment has already taken place, 36 is the benchmark for playing to that.
Post 26#?
So if I read that correctly someone who has been a 4/5 handicapper for 20 years could become 8/9 handicap overnighton the introduction of WHS because they play a difficult course?
 

Traminator

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Post 26#?
So if I read that correctly someone who has been a 4/5 handicapper for 20 years could become 8/9 handicap overnighton the introduction of WHS because they play a difficult course?
We will, I believe, have a handicap index, for example 4.6.
Every course will be rated and will have a chart. When you go and play, for example, Mickey Mouse Golf Course off the white tees, yes you might start the day off 7 handicap if the difficulty rating is 2 shots higher than par.

Every course, every set of tees will have its own rating.
 

Lilyhawk

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Did you see my explanation?

Each time you play a course, your handicap will/might be different and will be worked out from the chart BEFORE you tee off.

You could be a 5 off whites at your own course and a 3 off yellows.
On another course you might be a 6 off the whites and 4 off the yellows.
Therefore, since the adjustment has already taken place, 36 is the benchmark for playing to that.
I don’t think that is correct if it’s anything to be like it is in Sweden, which I posted a chart as an example off. Your handicap index stays the same wherever you go, but the amount of shots given on that particular course will vary dependent on the slope of the course. It is correct though that you will see how many shots any handicap is given before teeing off.
 

Traminator

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I don’t think that is correct if it’s anything to be like it is in Sweden, which I posted a chart as an example off. Your handicap index stays the same wherever you go, but the amount of shots given on that particular course will vary dependent on the slope of the course. It is correct though that you will see how many shots any handicap is given before teeing off.
Yes I believe we're saying the same, perhaps I should have written that your "shots received" instead of your "handicap". 👍
For Brits we all just need to get our heads round our handicap/shots given being adjusted before we play.
 

Lilyhawk

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Yes I believe we're saying the same, perhaps I should have written that your "shots received" instead of your "handicap". 👍
For Brits we all just need to get our heads round our handicap/shots given being adjusted before we play.
Yeah, think we did. 👍

Just take it from someone who used to play with this, it’s super simple really. Just look at the chart provided and if you’re given more shots than what your handicap index is, just take it and be happy.
 

saving_par

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We will, I believe, have a handicap index, for example 4.6.
Every course will be rated and will have a chart. When you go and play, for example, Mickey Mouse Golf Course off the white tees, yes you might start the day off 7 handicap if the difficulty rating is 2 shots higher than par.

Every course, every set of tees will have its own rating.
Okay, I think I'm getting there.

Two golfers 4.6 index, one plays a rock hard track the other an easier track playing together at an away course. They are probably playing off different handicaps on the day?

How does this work with events with a handicap ballot?
 

Backsticks

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It is something you should always expect to do.

Give yourself the gameplan, sufficient practice and mental approach to do so every round. (Strategy, technical and mental)
You certainly shouldn't expect to, unless you are a bandit. If playing off an honest and accurate handicap, then it's simply impossible to do so every time, or even anywhere near that. Taking a 36pts CSS, then you should average 31-34pts and only occasionally getting 36, even more rarely, beating it.
It depends what one defines as 'to your handicap'. 36pts, or, in your normal handicap range and so your handicap is correct.
Based on a single round, anyone exceeding 30pts has probably played to their handicap.
 

Traminator

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Okay, I think I'm getting there.

Two golfers 4.6 index, one plays a rock hard track the other an easier track playing together at an away course. They are probably playing off different handicaps on the day?

How does this work with events with a handicap ballot?
I don't know, I'm out 😅
 

hovis

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It‘s not a mentality, it is a fact. The method of calculating a handicap uses a multiplying factor of less than 1 which means that your handicap is not what you normally shoot. If you normally shoot your handicap, it is too high.
So if I played a hundred rounds and shot 36 points every time (css adjusted) my handicap is too high? Why doesn't it get cut the then?
 

Backsticks

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So if I played a hundred rounds and shot 36 points every time (css adjusted) my handicap is too high? Why doesn't it get cut the then?
This is a flawed question. The hc system is built on the real world variation that an individual can achieve. So in reality you simply CANNOT shoot 36 a hundred times in a row. Even a pro tour event, with the à high concentration of the most skilled, consistent golfers in the world, will have a score variation of 15 shots on a given day.
So any one shooting too consistently in amateur golf has too high a handicap, and is using those spare shots to smooth their average.
 

Canary Kid

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All this demonstrates is how a totally hypothetical, and incredibly unrealistic, situation will distort reality. Nobody would get 36 points in 100 successive rounds ... even the top players have a wide range in their scores, often in the same event. The fact remains that the calculation methodology means that your handicap will reflect you in a good, not a normal (i.e. average), round.
 

fundy

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It is very easy to calculate what your handicap index, course handicap then playing handicap will be under the WHS (there will be charts for this when it comes in)

Look at your handicap record, take the best 8 gross differential scores from the last 20 divide by 8 and you have your handicap index (round to one decimal point).

Find out the slope index for where you are playing ( https://ncrdb.usga.org/ ) divide this 113 and multiply by your handicap index, round to a whole number and this is your course handicap.

For a singles strokeplay comp the Course Handicap is multiplied by 0.95 to get to a playing handicap (0.4 goes down and 0.5 or better goes up).

From all this I would expect to see about a 2 shot difference at most depending on what the decimal figure is in the last calculation.

your definition of very easy and that of most golf club members is pretty far apart i would think!!!!
 
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