Falling back on left heel

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Swinglowandslow

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Hello
The latest fault I find creeping into my game, particularly driver and woods, is falling back on to my left heel when swinging through.
Then it's a big pull!
I'd love to have the follow thru on my left foot where the outside edge is on ground and inside edge up somewhat.
I'm wondering if feet positioning will help, I.e., at address, pointing the left foot to the left of 12 o,clock or to the right? Or neither? Or something else?
Advice welcome please.
 

SocketRocket

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Sep 12, 2011
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Hello
The latest fault I find creeping into my game, particularly driver and woods, is falling back on to my left heel when swinging through.
Then it's a big pull!
I'd love to have the follow thru on my left foot where the outside edge is on ground and inside edge up somewhat.
I'm wondering if feet positioning will help, I.e., at address, pointing the left foot to the left of 12 o,clock or to the right? Or neither? Or something else?
Advice welcome please.
This guy has some very good drills and ideas on the golf swing. From what you say this video should be a help for you.
 

Traminator

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Hello
The latest fault I find creeping into my game, particularly driver and woods, is falling back on to my left heel when swinging through.
Then it's a big pull!
Spine angle... You probably lose it and stand up on the downswing, aka early extension.
Been doing it for 40 years, would highly not recommend it, I know that feeling 😳
 

SocketRocket

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Spine angle... You probably lose it and stand up on the downswing, aka early extension.
Been doing it for 40 years, would highly not recommend it, I know that feeling 😳
You probably stand up on the shot to save it. Normally people early extend due to the the swingpath being too steep and creating a fat shot so your brain makes you stand up to rescue it.
Look at shallowing the club in the downswing and staying stacked.
 

Traminator

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You probably stand up on the shot to save it. Normally people early extend due to the the swingpath being too steep and creating a fat shot so your brain makes you stand up to rescue it.
Look at shallowing the club in the downswing and staying stacked.
You mean swingplane, not swingpath.

No, the standing up causes the steep plane, not the other way round.
 

SocketRocket

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You mean swingplane, not swingpath.

No, the standing up causes the steep plane, not the other way round.
No. If you swingath (or plane if you prefer) gets steep in the downswing it forces you to do something to rescue the shot, normally people will stand up to create room for the club or chicken wing the elbows. No one stands up in the swing for no reason.
 
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Traminator

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No, of you swingath or plane if you prefer gets steep in the downswing it forces you to do something to rescue the shot, normally people will stand up to create room for the club or chicken wing the elbows. No one stands up in the swing for no reason.
Lol, whatever.
 

mteam

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You mean swingplane, not swingpath.

No, the standing up causes the steep plane, not the other way round.
I see the opposite where standing up early extending is a shallowing move could you explain your thoughts on it causing steepness. I'm not saying you are wrong I'm just interested
 

Traminator

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I see the opposite where standing up early extending is a shallowing move could you explain your thoughts on it causing steepness. I'm not saying you are wrong I'm just interested
The hips thrust forward, the spine becomes more vertical, the arms, hands and therefore the grip of the club get closer to the ball and the grip ends up much higher than it started, voila the shaft is on a much steeper plane than before, the angle of attack is steeper, almost certainly causing an out to in path, resulting in a variety of misses (mainly necky cuts but often pulls) and back to the OP the weight falling back on the heels.
 

mteam

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The hips thrust forward, the spine becomes more vertical, the arms, hands and therefore the grip of the club get closer to the ball and the grip ends up much higher than it started, voila the shaft is on a much steeper plane than before, the angle of attack is steeper, almost certainly causing an out to in path, resulting in a variety of misses (mainly necky cuts but often pulls) and back to the OP the weight falling back on the heels.
Interesting do you think the shaft should return to the original setup plane
 

bobmac

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Great contribution.

I'm sure he has 2, and I'm sure most people can draw a parallel between what I described and what the OP.
I'm still waiting for a reply to my question before I comment, but in if the OP was falling back on both heals that would suggest no weight transfer on the downswing.
As the OP specifically said his left heal, that suggests a different issue to me.
 

Traminator

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Interesting do you think the shaft should return to the original setup plane
There's variation as the club gets longer but most of the best players get pretty close to it.

I'm talking big variations caused by the spine straightening and hands and arms flying forward, as demonstrated by us amateurs. It's a great way of hitting some fantastic shanks too 😳
 
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